North Carolina State UniversityThe Friday InstituteNCSU College of EducationNCSU NELA Project Hompage

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School executives will ensure that the school is a professional learning community. School executives will ensure that processes and systems are in place which result in recruitment, induction, support, evaluation, development, and retention of high performing staff. The school executive must engage and empower accomplished teachers in a distributive manner, including support of teachers in day-to-day decisions such as discipline, communication with parents/guardians, and protecting teachers from duties that interfere with teaching, and must practice fair and consistent evaluations of teachers. The school executive must engage teachers and other professional staff in conversations to plan their career paths and support district succession planning.

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4a. Professional Development/Learning Communities: The school executive ensures that the school is a professional learning community.
Experiences
  • By analyzing the result of the Co-Teaching evaluation survey, I was able to develop concrete suggestions and strategies for professional development that reflect characteristics of and promote the use of teacher expertise to improve professional learning communities. Suggestions on training:


  • Solicited the help of all NELA Fellows so that I can develop online structures and implement the development of effective professional learning communities and results-oriented professional development. I revised the school's PLC form to include the school’s vision and mission and the norms and expectations of each grade level PLC. Conducted informal after school drop in visits to enhancement teachers and helped them use online tools to conduct PLCs with their district counterparts.

  • Sit on year level PLCs to get first-hand information about teachers’ issues and concern. This helped me get a clear understanding on what to focus on improving instructional programs and practices.
  • Adopted and shared Co-teaching lesson planning template and Co-teaching Meeting Agenda template. The process in both templates facilitate opportunities for effective co-teaching planning that is focused on results, and characterized by collective responsibility for instructional planning and student learning.

Coursework
The following list of NELA coursework helped me work with the administrative team to ensure that the school is a professional learning community.
  • Aspiring Leader Self-Assessments
  • High School Developmental Project
  • Internship Project / Problem of Practice
  • Distinguished Leadership in Practice assignments:
  • High School Turnaround Case Study
  • Weekly Internship Logs
  • Middle School Developmental Project
  • Upper Elementary School Developmental Project
  • Facilitative Leadership & Crucial Conversations reflection
  • Formal Teacher Evaluations
  • Clinical Supervision Assignment
  • Pre-K / Early Elementary Developmental Project
Specialized Trainings
The following list of NELA Specialized Trainings helped me work with the administrative to ensure that the school is a professional learning community.
  • Schooling by Design
  • School Visits: KIPP Gaston, AB Combs, Bertie Middle School
  • Facilitative Leadership
  • Teacher Evaluation Instrument
  • Various Conferences, Community Schools Learning Lab, Seattle, WA
Related Readings
The following list of NELA Specialized Trainings helped me work with the administrative team to ensure that the school is a professional learning community.
  • Fullan, M. (2001). Leading in a culture of change. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
  • Fullan, M., & Ballew, A. C. (2004). Leading in a culture of change: Personal action guide and workbook. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
  • Kotter, J. P. (1996). Leading change. Boston, Mass: Harvard Business School Press.
  • Chenoweth, K. (2009). How it's being done. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard Education Press.
  • Florida, R. L. (2004). The rise of the creative class: And how it's transforming work, leisure, community and everyday life. New York: Basic Books.
  • Militello, M., Rallis, S. F., & Goldring, E. B. (2009). Leading with inquiry & action: How principals improve teaching and learning. Thousand Oaks, Calif: Corwin Press.
  • Wiggins, G. P., & McTighe, J. (2007). Schooling by design: Mission, action, and achievement. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.
  • Bridges, W. (2009). Managing transitions. USA: Dacapo Press.
  • 90-90-90 Article
  • Tipping Point

4b. Recruiting, Hiring, Placing and Mentoring of staff: The school executive establishes processes and systems in order to ensure a high-quality, high-performing staff.
Experiences
  • Extended encouragement and support to the teacher candidate to NELA Cohort III.
  • My day in school always starts with quick visits to all classrooms to ask teachers if they are “OK”.
  • Provided resources and materials to the AIG teacher as she take the lead in organizing the Anti-Bullying Patrol next school year.
  • Joined the school administrative team in interviewing teacher and assistant teacher applicants. The interview process allowed me the opportunity to use a variety of data at the school level to identify school needs in recruiting, hiring, and placing new teachers and staff. The Gallup interview questions helped me together with the other members of the panel to find the best fit for the position. Provide resources to teachers especially on strategies in dealing with defiant students.

  • Developed an action plan for a given scenario during our NELA Assessment Day.
Coursework
The following list of NELA coursework helped me work with the administrative team to ensure that the school is a professional learning community.
  • Aspiring Leader Self-Assessments
  • Internship Project / Problem of Practice
  • (Possible artifacts: PPT deck created for Dr. Corn’s class; slide created for poster; logic model; evaluation plan; video of students/teachers engaging in program)
  • Distinguished Leadership in Practice assignments:
  • High School Turnaround Case Study
  • Weekly Internship Logs
  • Formal Teacher Evaluations
  • Facilitative Leadership & Crucial Conversations reflection
  • Clinical Supervision Assignment
  • (Potential artifacts: video of conference, teacher evaluation rubric, reflection pape
Specialized Trainings
The following list of Specialized Trainings helped me work with the administrative team to ensure that the school is a professional learning community.
  • Understanding by Design
  • Schooling by Design
  • School Visits: KIPP Gaston, AB Combs, Bertie Middle School
  • Llano Grande Digital Storytelling Workshop
  • Facilitative Leadership
  • Crucial Conversations
  • Teacher Evaluation Instrument
  • Conflict Resolution
  • Various Conferences
  • Community Schools Learning Lab, Seattle, WA
Related Readings
The following list of NELA Selected books and articles helped me work with the administrative team to ensure that the school is a professional learning community.
  • Bolman, L. G., & Deal, T. E. (2003). Reframing organizations: Artistry, choice, and leadership. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
  • Tyack, D. B., & Cuban, L. (1995). Tinkering toward utopia: A century of public school reform. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press.
  • Senge, P. M. (1994). The Fifth discipline fieldbook: Strategies and tools for building a learning organization. New York: Currency, Doubleday.
  • Covey, S. R. (2004). The 7 habits of highly effective people: Restoring the character ethic. New York: Free Press.
  • Lane, K. E. (2005). The Principal's legal handbook. Dayton, Ohio: Education Law Association.
  • Schimmel, D., Militello, M., & Eckes, S. (2010). Principals teaching the law: 10 legal lessons your teachers must know. Thousand Oaks, Calif: Corwin Press.
  • Tschannen-Moran, M. (2004). Trust matters: Leadership for successful schools. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
  • Fullan, M. (2001). Leading in a culture of change. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
  • Fullan, M., & Ballew, A. C. (2004). Leading in a culture of change: Personal action guide and workbook. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
  • Carnegie, D. (1981). How to win friends and influence people. New York: Simon and Schuster.
  • Kotter, J. P. (1996). Leading change. Boston, Mass: Harvard Business School Press.
  • Chenoweth, K. (2009). How it's being done. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard Education Press.
  • Patterson, K. (2002). Crucial conversations: Tools for talking when stakes are high. New York: McGraw-Hill.
  • Covey, S. M. R., & Merrill, R. R. (2006). The speed of trust: The one thing that changes everything. New York: Free Press.
  • Florida, R. L. (2004). The rise of the creative class: And how it's transforming work, leisure, community and everyday life. New York: Basic Books.
  • Militello, M., Rallis, S. F., & Goldring, E. B. (2009). Leading with inquiry & action: How principals improve teaching and learning. Thousand Oaks, Calif: Corwin Press.
  • Theoharis, G. (2009). The school leaders our children deserve: Seven keys to equity, social justice, and school reform. New York: Teachers College Press.
  • Fullan, M. (2008). What's worth fighting for in the principalship?. New York: Teachers College Press.
  • Wiggins, G. P., & McTighe, J. (2007). Schooling by design: Mission, action, and achievement. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.
  • Bridges, W. (2009). Managing transitions. USA: Dacapo Press.
  • Tipping Point
  • 90-90-90 Article

4c. Teacher and Staff Evaluation: The school executive evaluates teachers and other staff in a fair and equitable manner with the focus on improving performance and, thus, student achievement.
Experiences
  • Observed the principal and assistant principal as they provide formal feedback to teachers. This helped me in conducting pre and post observation with the teachers, in providing them feedbacks concerning their classroom instruction and ways to improve their instructional practice.

  • My participation in the district-wide leadership training facilitated by the Quality Teaching and Learning also helped me evaluate teachers in a fair and equitable manner.

  • Used the New North Carolina Teacher Evaluation Rubric to evaluate teachers. I was trained by our principal to navigate and use the online evaluation process. The debrief every after formal observations that we (administrative team) conducted really improved my skills is giving feedbacks to teachers.
Coursework
The following list of NELA Coursework helped me work with the administrative team to ensure that the school is a professional learning community.
  • Aspiring Leader Self-Assessments
  • High School Developmental Project
  • Distinguished Leadership in Practice assignments:
  • Weekly Internship Logs
  • Formal Teacher Evaluations
  • Middle School Developmental Project
  • Fall 2011 Assessment Day: - Video reflection on school culture
  • NELA operation: Triad role plays re: teacher interactions
  • Action plan for teacher
  • Upper Elementary School Developmental Project
  • Facilitative Leadership & Crucial Conversations reflection
  • Clinical Supervision Assignment
  • (Potential artifacts: video of conference, teacher evaluation rubric, reflection paper)
  • Pre-K / Early Elementary Developmental Project
Specialized Trainings
The following list of NELA Specialized Trainings helped me work with the administrative to ensure that the school is a professional learning community.
  • Data Day: EVAAS, ACRE, Metametrics, NC WISE
  • Literacy
  • Common Core Overview (the one we had on mock interview day)
  • Understanding by Design
  • Schooling by Design
  • Mathematics Common Core Trajectories
  • Assistments
  • Facilitative Leadership
  • Crucial Conversations
  • Teacher Evaluation Instrument
  • DPI Special Education Day
  • Conflict Resolution
Related Reading
The following list of NELA Selected books and reading helped me work with the administrative to ensure that the school is a professional learning community.
  • Tyack, D. B., & Cuban, L. (1995). Tinkering toward utopia: A century of public school reform. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press.
  • Lane, K. E. (2005). The Principal's legal handbook. Dayton, Ohio: Education Law Association.
  • Schimmel, D., Militello, M., & Eckes, S. (2010). Principals teaching the law: 10 legal lessons your teachers must know. Thousand Oaks, Calif: Corwin Press.
  • Huefner, D. S. (2006). Getting comfortable with special education law: A framework for working with children with disabilities. Norwood, Mass: Christopher-Gordon Publishers.
  • Guthrie, J. W. (2007). Modern education finance and policy. Boston: Pearson/Allyn and Bacon.
  • Tschannen-Moran, M. (2004). Trust matters: Leadership for successful schools. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
  • Fullan, M. (2001). Leading in a culture of change. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
  • Carnegie, D. (1981). How to win friends and influence people. New York: Simon and Schuster.
  • Kotter, J. P. (1996). Leading change. Boston, Mass: Harvard Business School Press.
  • Chenoweth, K. (2009). How it's being done. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard Education Press.
  • Meece, J. L., & Daniels, D. H. (2008). Child and adolescent development for educators. Boston: McGraw-Hill Higher Education.
  • Patterson, K. (2002). Crucial conversations: Tools for talking when stakes are high. New York: McGraw-Hill.
  • Covey, S. M. R., & Merrill, R. R. (2006). The speed of trust: The one thing that changes everything. New York: Free Press.
  • Friedman, T. L. (2007). The world is flat: A brief history of the twenty-first century. New York: Picador/Farrar, Straus and Giroux.
  • Militello, M., Rallis, S. F., & Goldring, E. B. (2009). Leading with inquiry & action: How principals improve teaching and learning. Thousand Oaks, Calif: Corwin Press.
  • Daniels, D. H., Beaumont, L. J., & Doolin, C. A. (2008).Understanding children: An interview and observation guide for educators. Boston: McGraw-Hill Higher Education.
  • Eller, J., & Eller, S. (2010). Working with and evaluating difficult school employees. Thousand Oaks, Calif: Corwin.
  • Theoharis, G. (2009). The school leaders our children deserve: Seven keys to equity, social justice, and school reform. New York: Teachers College Press.
  • Wood, C. (2007). Yardsticks: Children in the classroom, ages 4-14. Turners Falls, MA: Northeast Foundation for Children.
  • Fullan, M. (2008). What's worth fighting for in the principalship?. New York: Teachers College Press.
  • Wiggins, G. P., & McTighe, J. (2011). The understanding by design guide to creating high-quality units. Alexandria, Va: ASCD.
  • Wiggins, G. P., & McTighe, J. (2007). Schooling by design: Mission, action, and achievement. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.
  • Bridges, W. (2009). Managing transitions. USA: Dacapo Press.
  • Steele, C. (2010). Whistling Vivaldi: And other clues to how stereotypes affect us. New York: W.W. Norton & Company.
  • Payne, R. K. (2009). A framework for understanding poverty. Moorabbin, Vic: Hawker Brownlow Education.
  • Robinson, K. (2011). Out of our minds: Learning to be creative. Chichester: Capstone.
  • 90-90-90 Article
  • Tipping Point
  • Ruby Payne RTI
  • Why Reading by 3rd Grade Matters
  • Creating the Opportunity to Learn
  • North Carolina General Statutes, Chapter 115

Artifacts and Documentations
  • Developed concrete suggestions and strategies for professional development that reflect characteristics of and promote the use of teacher expertise to improve professional learning communities. Suggestions on training:



Online tools I developed for Enhancement teachers so they can conduct PLCs with their district counterparts.

  • Sit on year level PLCs to get first-hand information about teachers’ issues and concern. This helped me get a clear understanding on what to focus on improving instructional programs and practices.

PLC_pics_taken_by_Doug.jpg

  • Adopted and shared Co-teaching lesson planning template and Co-teaching Meeting Agenda template. The process in both templates facilitate opportunities for effective co-teaching planning that is focused on results, and characterized by collective responsibility for instructional planning and student learning.






  • Provided resources to teachers especially on strategies in dealing with defiant students.


  • Developed an action plan for a given scenario during our NELA Assessment Day.
  • Observing the principal and assistant principal as they provide formal feedback to teachers helped me in conducting pre and post observation with the teachers, in providing them feedbacks concerning their classroom instruction and ways to improve their instructional practice.

  • My participation in the district-wide leadership training facilitated by the Quality Teaching and Learning also helped me evaluate teachers in a fair and equitable manner.

  • I was trained by our principal to navigate and use the online evaluation process. The debrief every after formal observations that we (administrative team) conducted really improved my skills is giving feedbacks to teachers.
Online Teacher Evaluation


One of the teachers trying one of the strategies I've shared.